September 22, 2011

jonathan harris and sep kamvar: we feel fine



data as art | interactive:
the visualization of an automatic log that searches the blogosphere for statements about human emotion—the key words being the phrases “I feel” and “I am feeling."
please allow a few moments for the experience to load.
hint: filter data via top toolbar; change format via 'mob', 'murmur', etc; visuals via 'montage'

(to close app: go to wefeelfine.org)




curator commentary:
years ago, before the term “web 2.0” was a cliche and the power of social media was beyond the grasp of marketers, jonathan harris and sep kamvar started a little project called we feel fine. the idea was straightforward: set up an automatic log that searches the blogosphere for statements about human emotion ¬– the key words being the phrases “i feel” and “i am feeling.” whatever followed those terms would be captured along with any relevant metadata (such as the age, gender and location of the author).

the result is what harris calls “a database of several million human feelings” that can be parsed, segmented, and displayed in a nearly infinite number of ways. harris and kamvar set up we feel fine in 2005 and offered a variety of visualizations on their website. how people were feeling on valentine’s day, for instance. in 2009 they published the visualizations as a book. the app shown here allows users to select from a compendium of feelings and narrow their search by gender, location, age, and year. the result shows a living, thriving, and exhaustive catalog of human emotion. as harris and kamvar say in their faq, “this is a project about people. blogs are just the medium.”


via adobe museum of digital media










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